May 23, 2017

Certain Unalienable Rights

So much chatter surrounds the topic of “rights.” We believe we have the “right” to so many things — to perpetual comfort, to have things our way, to do whatever we feel like doing whenever we feel like doing it.

If we can’t sleep at night, we get upset because we think we have a “right” to sleep. If our energies are low and our to-do lists for the day wear us out, we get upset because we believe we have a “right” to good health. If there are bills that can’t be paid or comforts that can’t be bought when we want them, we get upset since we feel we have a “right” to financial comfort. If a family member or close friend offers instruction or constructive criticism regarding a lifestyle choice we have made, we get upset because we want to have the “right” to live our own way.

So how then are we to be happy? Assuming, of course, that we have the right to be happy, which I believe we do — Scripture is resplendent with promises of blessing and abundant life.

Our problem is that we are trying to find happiness in the wrong kind of abundance. We are searching for it in good health and great wealth – but we are never promised those things by God. He does promise to provide for our needs, and He promises to give us whatever is good for us, but He never promises to fulfill every wish and desire that we ever have. And He never promises us a “comfortable” life, only an abundant one as we walk in Him. He promises us joy and peace and love, and all the other fruits of the Spirit, and He promises us that He will never leave us. But those all fulfill our needs for spiritual health and wealth, rather than physical, and they can only be found by living His way, not our own way.

What we need to do, then, is yield to God what we believe to be our “rights” to comfort. To search our hearts and question whether we really believe our God to be enough for us, enough to meet every need that we have, enough to let us have the aforementioned abundant life.

Think about it: if I believe my God is more than enough, I will be content with a lack of sleep, low energy, or poor health, because He has promised me enough divine power and grace to handle everything He chooses to bring my way. If I believe my God is more than enough, I will be content with whatever material possessions or financial stability He has provided for me, because He has promised me that He will supply all I truly need in this life. If I believe my God is more than enough, I will be content with living His way, with whatever circumstances He sees fit to bring me through, because He has promised that He will never leave me or forsake me.

The question is, do I truly believe that my God is more than enough?


Trackbacks

  1. […] our responses (Theology of a Smile). 2. Our circumstances should not determine our responses (Certain Unalienable Rights). 3. Our circumstances should not determine our responses (More Thoughts on […]