December 15, 2017

So Easy to Worry

Sometimes, it’s so easy to worry…

And if you have a chronic illness, or some other prolonged trial, it’s even easier. So many possibilities of things going wrong, so many situations to be prepared for.

For instance, when… your spouse is a few minutes late getting home, the emergency sirens start going off for a test, you wake up with a sore throat, you have some unexplained muscle pain, your parents don’t answer the phone, your best friend hasn’t replied to this morning’s text messages, your boss wants a conference with you (etc, etc, etc).

Sometimes we even want to stew over a problem for a while. We don’t want to hear the hard, but true, admonitions to be surrendered to God’s will and wait on His timing– we want to mull the problem over, examining it from every angle, before finally releasing it with trembling hands to the sovereign Creator. We like to scare ourselves, for some strange reason. We like to dwell on the horrible possibilities.

But worry is sin. It places our desires for ideal circumstances — our need for control — ahead of whatever God may allow. It doubts that God is able to give us joy and peace in every situation. It decides that finding rest in God is dependent on finding rest in our circumstances. 

Not to mention, worry is also irrational. Most “worst-case scenarios” never even come true. Think of that the next time you want to spend hours worrying over some horrible possibility. How much time we squander by fantasizing about things that may or may not happen!

Unfortunately, those truths don’t always penetrate our thick skulls. We still worry, despite its sinfulness and irrationality. So how do we fight it? How can we conquer worry?

Click over here to read the rest.

 

How do you respond, when worry comes too easily?

Comments

  1. This is so true, Elizabeth. I have enjoyed reading a couple of your posts today and hope to return often as time permits. I just bought the book by Nancy Leigh DeMoss and hope to get the chance to start reading it tonight. Thanks.

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